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Cartoon: Finish Line

Jo Becker, Andrew Sullivan, gay marriage, same-sex marriage, marriage equality

(Washington Blade cartoon by Ranslem)

30
Apr
2014

Blade staff to attend White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner

Chris Johnson, gay news, Washington Blade, Michigan

Washington Blade political reporter Chris Johnson. (Washington Blade photo by Damien Salas)

The Washington Blade, which is celebrating its 45th anniversary this year, will have a presence at Saturday night’s centennial celebration of the White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner.

Several Blade staffers, including editor Kevin Naff, White House reporter Chris Johnson and senior reporter Lou Chibbaro, Jr. will be there, along with the Blade’s special guest, blogger Andrew Sullivan.

The Blade was recently added to the in-town press pool, marking the first time the White House Correspondents’ Association extended the honor to an LGBT outlet. Johnson has served as the Blade’s reporter in the pool this year. Chibbaro was first credentialed at the White House during the Reagan administration but did not serve in the press pool of reporters that shadow the president when he leaves the White House.

The Blade has had a complicated history with the White House press corps. Its credentials were revoked during the second term of the George W. Bush administration but promptly reinstated when Barack Obama was sworn in.

“We’re excited to celebrate this milestone in the Blade’s long journey,” said Naff, who invited Sullivan to join the Blade contingent as a thank you for his contribution to the marriage equality movement. “Andrew was writing about marriage equality when most of today’s activists were still in the closet. He deserves our community’s gratitude and we all look forward to a fun night.”

Comedian and actor Joel McHale will emcee Saturday’s event, which is being broadcast on CNN from 8-11 p.m. President Obama is scheduled to speak. You can follow Blade observations at @washblade or @chrisjohnson82.

02
May
2014

Much to celebrate this Pride season

Pride season, gay news, gay politics dc

Capital Pride (Washington Blade file photo by Michael Key)

We have a lot to celebrate this year as Pride season arrives. The biggest reason may be the Windsor decision handed down by the Supreme Court on June 26, 2013. Since that time, judges across the nation have based their rulings that states from Pennsylvania to Utah must recognize same-sex marriages on this decision. June 1 marked the day that same-sex marriages could begin in Illinois. Gov. Martin O’Malley signed a bill banning discrimination against the transgender community in Maryland and a petition drive to put that up to a referendum in the state failed.

In Texas, Houston Mayor Annise Parker signed the Equal Rights Ordinance. That signature came after an 11-hour Council session of which the city secretary said, “it was the largest public turnout Houston had ever seen at a City Council meeting.” We have seen many changes in federal policy that give same-sex married couples more rights and no less a conservative than Utah Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) recently said that though he personally doesn’t support same-sex marriage it is inevitable that it will become the law of the land.

A year ago, “Kinky Boots,” based on a film adapted by Harvey Fierstein with music by Cyndi Lauper, won the Tony Award for Best Musical. Sunday we can look forward to out and talented Neil Patrick Harris winning this year’s Tony Award for best actor in a musical for “Hedwig and the Angry Inch.” Larry Kramer finally saw his play, “The Normal Heart,” made into a successful film for HBO. Our community is still fighting about issues surrounding AIDS as seen by the recent debate between Kramer and columnist Andrew Sullivan about the impact of the drug Truvada.

The Pride parade Saturday will wind through the Dupont and Logan Circle neighborhoods. The parade is fun but has always been a little long. One way to shorten it would be to have all politicians and candidates participate together. Have the mayor lead off the parade with other politicians joining him/her in a line at the front. If there is still a clamor by any of them to have a separate contingent there could be a lottery and they would be interspersed throughout the parade, between the fun floats and bands, so people wouldn’t have to watch the first hour of just politicians.

Pride festivities have grown over the years and this year there are more than 30 official events listed on the Capital Pride website that span from Jewish Pride Happy Hour at MOVA to the Night Out at the Nationals. Many of the events listed cater to specific groups within the LGBT community because, like the rest of society, we are a diverse community. We are young and old, men and women, black, white, Latino and Asian and have representation in every religious denomination and all of us want to celebrate and showcase our Pride.

As we celebrate we should always take a moment to remember those who have helped to move us forward over the years. We need to think about and thank all those who both publicly and behind the scenes fought for our civil and human rights when it wasn’t easy to be out and proud. We must also remember those friends and loved ones who died of AIDS during the years when our community fought to bring attention to the disease our government was failing to respond to.

And as we celebrate our victories we need to pledge to continue to work toward full equality — to fight to ensure the rights of transgender persons and to continue the fight to pass legislation like ENDA. We also need to demand that the president live up to a promise he made to us in 2008, and which he has pointedly not kept, to sign an executive order protecting the rights of LGBT workers in federal contracting. While we may thank him for announcing a history project in front of the Stonewall Inn, I am sure nearly all of us would trade that for a signature on the executive order.

03
Jun
2014

Have we lost the ability to be magnanimous when winning or gracious in victory?

gracious, Mozilla-Firefox, Brendan Eich, gay news, Washington Blade

Are we incapable of shedding a victim’s impulse for retribution? (Washington Blade cartoon by Ranslem)

Based on the over-hyped pseudo controversy of the past week, it appears that pitchforks and lit torches have suddenly become fashion accessories among some gays and lesbians and even a few straight supporters.

It’s an ugly trend.

If you’re out of the loop on this, be grateful. It’s almost too painful to recount. The gay community has, once again, been embarrassed by the impulsive impatience and frenzied frustration of activist-extremists. It is likely we’ve also lost the confidence of more than a small number of more conscientious allies along the way.

A troubling display of bloodlust tends to do that.

Most reputable LGBT organizations didn’t take the bait when last week’s controversy regarding open-source technology company Mozilla and its selection of Javascript and Firefox developer Brendan Eich as CEO exploded online like projectile vomiting. The political fringe began calling for his head on a platter, or at least the loss of his employment. He would resign in the wake of the ensuing brouhaha over a long-ago political donation.

No matter that had the situation, or politics, been reversed, the outcry would have been righteously and inversely indignant. Why quibble over principle when a retributive beheading is possible?

His offense? As was long-ago known and publicly debated, Eich had made a small personal contribution to support California’s Proposition 8 campaign opposing the legalization of same-sex marriage. He did so eight years ago, when quite a few others, including prominent public figures and national politicians of many stripes, were not yet willing to support marriage equality – along with the voters of the state.

Never mind that he was universally regarded as a fair administrator, had no history of discriminating against anyone, and pledged to continue and expand corporate diversity policies and programs encouraging acceptance and accommodation. A sort of hapless techno-nerd unskilled in public relations would not be accorded the same courtesy or rights his detractors would expect if roles were reversed.

The transparently ill-considered and contradictory rationalizations for demanding his firing were both simultaneously disheartening and hilarious. Cultural cleansing and purification of opinion were deemed to be superior considerations.

Too many in the chattering class and so-called “progressive” activists gleefully rushed to make an example of an iconic heretic. Consternation by others, notably writer and political commentator Andrew Sullivan, only fueled the ire of what was rapidly devolving into a seething, albeit small, online mob. Soon the crazy only got crazier. Leftist anger bred right-wing outrage and vice-versa, generating the inevitable cycle of viciousness and cartoonish characterizations.

It wasn’t long until liberal Bill Maher dismissively belittled this boorish behavior on his political-comedic TV show, telling viewers amid a backdrop of chortling guest panelists and cackling audience members, “I think there is a gay mafia. I think if you cross them you do get whacked.”

A well-reasoned op-ed by New York Times columnist Frank Bruni last weekend concluded, “Sullivan is right to raise concerns about the public flogging of someone like Eich. Such vilification won’t accelerate the timetable of victory, which is certain. And it doesn’t reflect well on the victors.”

It is astonishing that in the midst of winning hearts and minds on the most essential elements of equality, some would gamble the goodwill of the many for the pleasure of revenge on the few. Punishing those reluctant or unwilling to yet concur only yields suspicion that those who countenance divergent political views might be next.

Call it a moral issue exception if you want, but concocting an illegitimate justification offers no comfort to those caused to wonder exactly who might suffer a good old-fashioned public shaming. If this type of inappropriate and unacceptable reaction is allowed on one instance, what citizen-suspects on what other public issues will also be rounded up for punishment?

Have we lost the ability to be magnanimous when winning or gracious in victory? Are we incapable of shedding a victim’s impulse for retribution?

If so, that’s sad.

Mark Lee is a long-time entrepreneur and community business advocate. Follow on Twitter: @MarkLeeDC. Reach him at OurBusinessMatters@gmail.com.

09
Apr
2014

New book on marriage equality assailed as ‘travesty’

Human Rights Campaign, American Foundation for Equal Rights, AFER, HRC, marriage equality, same-sex marriage, gay marriage, Virginia, Chad Griffin, Tom Shuttleworth, Carol Schall, Emily, Mary Townley, Adam Umhoefer, David Boies, Ted Olson, Tim Bostic, Washington Blade, Tony London

Human Rights Campaign President Chad Griffin is lionized in “Forcing the Spring” for his role in the marriage movement. (Blade file by Michael Key)

A new book on the advancement of marriage equality and the lawsuit that overturned Proposition 8 is stirring controversy over its lionization of HRC President Chad Griffin and its depiction of the federal lawsuit he helped initiate against the California ban.

The book, “Forcing the Spring,” was written by Jo Becker, a New York Times journalist who was embedded with Griffin and the Prop 8 team as their lawsuit moved forward. The book hit shelves on Tuesday, but has already incurred the ire of many in the LGBT movement who say it heaps too much praise on Griffin and ignores others who led the marriage equality effort for decades.

The notion that Griffin, a board member of American Foundation for Equal Rights, is the hero who saved the marriage equality movement pervades the 437-page work.

One part of the book that addresses his move to D.C. in 2012 to become head of the Human Rights Campaign includes a farewell discussion in which fellow AFER board member Rob Reiner says of Griffin, “If there ever is going to be — and there will be at some point — the first gay president, you’re looking at him.”

As noted by gay blogger Andrew Sullivan in his tirade against the book, “Forcing the Spring” opens with a comparison of Griffin and civil rights icon Rosa Parks, saying a revolution begins when someone “grows tired of standing idly by” against the tide of injustice.

“It begins when a black seamstress named Rosa Parks refuses to give up her seat on a bus to white man in the segregated South,” Becker writes. “And in this story, it begins with a handsome, bespectacled thirty-five-year old political consultant named Chad Griffin, in a spacious suite at the Westin St. Francis hotel in San Francisco on election night 2008.”

It’s this comparison between Griffin and the iconic figure of the black civil rights movement that Sullivan, who helped pioneer the idea of same-sex marriage in the 1990s, says is only the start of “jaw-dropping distortion” throughout the book.

Andrew Lane, a prominent New York-based gay donor, called the book a “travesty” and said Becker knew that was the case as she was putting the book together.

“She chose to give us a shallow and incomplete history that fetishizes the role of celebrities and PR hacks and either trashes or ignores the real heroes who fought for years to help make the moment possible,” Lane said. “That vapid gay men are attempting to re-write history by centering themselves is not news. That they conscripted a New York Times reporter to do the heavy lifting for them certainly is.”

HRC didn’t respond to multiple requests for comment on the perception that Griffin and the Prop 8 case are given undue credit in the book for their role in the marriage equality movement.

A significant portion of the book is devoted to the behind-the-scenes action leading to President Obama’s announcement in favor of marriage equality in 2012. Although Obama campaigned in 2008 in opposition to same-sex marriage (despite supporting it in 1996), he later said he could evolve on the issue, leading to his announcement in favor of same-sex marriage during his re-election campaign.

According to the book, when Vice President Joseph Biden appeared to endorse same-sex marriage on NBC’s “Meet the Press” just days before Obama’s announcement, the White House reacted furiously. In a chain of emails sent through the White House, senior adviser to the president Valerie Jarrett through an intermediary accused Biden of “downright disloyalty.”

Griffin gets credit as a key voice for moving these evolutions forward. A passage in the book recounts Griffin briefly asking the president during a fundraiser, “How can we help you evolve more quickly?” Obama gave a non-committed response, but pointed to his work on “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” repeal and the Defense of Marriage Act as evidence of his commitment to LGBT rights.

Further, it recounts Griffin attending a Los Angeles fundraiser with Biden prior to his appearance on “Meet the Press.” After Griffin asked Biden what he really thinks about marriage equality, the vice president said being against it in the future will be a “political liability.” A top Biden aide is quoted as saying it was a moment when “his hard drive got erased.”

John Aravosis, editor of AMERICAblog, criticized the depiction of Griffin as being a driving factor in Obama’s evolution, especially because others who contributed to the effort — like his own blogger who got Obama to say he could evolve on marriage — are absent from the book.

“I had high hopes for Chad taking over HRC, and said so publicly, but I don’t honestly know what Chad did to get the president to evolve on marriage,” Aravosis said. “You wouldn’t know it from Jo Becker’s self-proclaimed ‘definitive account’ of the gay marriage battle these past five years, but the president used that word in response to a question from then-AMERICAblog deputy editor Joe Sudbay, who questioned the president in the White House in October of 2010. Becker gives neither Joe, nor AMERICAblog, any credit, for the now-famous answer.”

Also depicted as contributing to Obama’s evolution on marriage is Ken Mehlman, the former head of the Republican National  Committee who came out as gay in 2010. Mehlman attended Harvard with Obama, so the two had known each other for decades.

According to the book, Mehlman e-mailed Obama senior adviser David Plouffe some talking points and suggested soft lighting for the interview and that it be conducted by a female reporter (it ended up being Robin Roberts of “Good Morning America,” who was closeted at the time).

It’s not the first time the events leading up to Obama’s announcement in favor of same-sex marriage have been reported. The 2013 book “Double Down,” which chronicles Obama’s re-election campaign, also discusses the lead-up to the endorsement. The book similarly recounts the fervor in the White House after Biden’s words on “Meet the Press” and Mehlman’s advice to Obama for his interview, although Griffin makes no appearance in that narrative.

While praising Griffin, the book doesn’t present as favorable an image of other leaders in the marriage equality movement. Among them is Evan Wolfson, president of Freedom to Marry, who spoke out on marriage equality when it was much less popular — even among LGBT rights groups — in the 1990s.

One portion of the book disparages Wolfson for having unkind words for “Milk” screenwriter and AFER board member Dustin Lance Black after he pledged in his Oscar acceptance speech that equal rights will come very soon for gay people across America.

“Wolfson had berated the younger man over his Oscar speech, explaining as though to a willing but ignorant child his ongoing, twenty-five year plan to build support for marriage equality,” Becker writes. “Twenty-five years? Black had practically gasped. But he had said little; it was intimidating, to say the least, to be dressed down by a pioneer of the marriage equality movement.”

In response to a Blade inquiry on whether he’s given a fair shake in the book, Wolfson spoke in holistic terms on progress made on marriage equality and future goals to advance it further.

“As a movement, we have secured a strong majority of public support for the freedom to marry and a critical mass of Americans living in marriage states,” Wolfson said. “Together, we gutted the so-called Defense of Marriage Act, and, as we again head toward the Supreme Court, have built irrefutable momentum showing America is ready. But we are not done. Freedom to Marry is going to stay focused on finishing the job and achieving the goal we’ve long been aiming toward: winning marriage nationwide.”

Another person whose role is minimized in the book is Mary Bonauto, the civil rights director at Gay & Lesbian Advocates & Defenders, who successfully argued the case almost 11 years ago that brought marriage equality to Massachusetts, making it the first state in the country with same-sex marriage. She has also led efforts against the Defense of Marriage Act.

Her role in “Forcing the Spring” is reduced to commending the Prop 8 lawsuit for enabling a trial of the issue of marriage equality. “They turned that trial into a truth commission,” Bonauto is quoted as saying of the attorneys behind the lawsuit.

Carisa Cunningham, a GLAD spokesperson, dismissed the omission of Bonauto’s work on marriage equality by saying the book was meant to capture the narrative of another effort to advance the cause.

“This book wasn’t Mary’s story, and it’s clearly not a history of the movement,” Cunningham said. ”Someday someone will write a book about Mary, and in the meantime, Mary’s story has been told in plenty of public ways and she and GLAD get a lot of well-deserved credit. We’re in it for the work – on principle and how it makes a difference in people’s lives.”

Cunningham also criticized the depiction of Griffin in the book, saying although he offered significant contributions to advancing marriage equality, the book “may do a disservice to those contributions by portraying him as a savior of the movement.”

But the crux of the book is that the lawsuit against Prop 8 litigated by Ted Olson and David Boies restructured the marriage movement. The title itself, “Forcing the Spring,” suggests the Prop 8 case was responsible for bringing marriage equality to the entire country — or at least getting the ball rolling for successes in other states besides California.

But it was the decision in the DOMA case — not the Prop 8 case — that established legal precedent enabling courts since that ruling to rule in favor of marriage equality in now 10 states. The U.S. Supreme Court on the Prop 8 case sidestepped the merits of whether a state can ban same-sex marriage, ruling that proponents of the law had no standing to defend the ban in court after California state officials declined to do so.

The conclusion of Becker’s account gives credit to the lawsuit against DOMA, but says the arguments in the Prop 8 case influenced U.S. Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy’s decision in striking down the federal law.

“By intertwining arguments from both cases, Kennedy gave the Windsor decision a heft and precedential value it might not otherwise have had, providing powerful legal ammunition for a slew of future challenges to state bans on same-sex marriage,” Becker writes.

It should be noted, as previously reported by the Blade, that Olson and Boies’ assistance in the Prop 8 lawsuit came with a hefty $6.4 million price tag. Moreover, HRC, now headed by Griffin, was among the nine signatories of a letter that came out the day before the Prop 8 lawsuit was filed and urged restraint in taking the case to court.

“It is by no means clear that a federal challenge to Prop. 8 can win now,” the letter says. “And an unsuccessful challenge may delay marriage even longer, not only in California but in other states, and seriously damage the rights of LGBT people on many other important issues.”

Nonetheless, HRC in the past week has been promoting the book and its depiction of the Prop 8 case in various blog postings on the organization’s website. One March 26 posting in the weeks prior to the publication of the book calls it “an unparalleled testament to the last five years in the American civil rights movement.”

Suzanne Goldberg, co-director for Columbia University’s Center for Gender & Sexuality Law, said she’s read the Becker book and faulted Becker for not telling the Prop 8 story in a way that better shows its place among other contributions to the marriage movement.

“I think the Perry case was, along with other cases, legislative and community-based advocacy, influential in shaping the marriage equality movement,” Goldberg said. ”The problem with Jo Becker’s book is not the up-close story she tells about the Prop 8 case and media work, which in itself is interesting, but rather the uncritical telling of that story as an account of the marriage equality movement. There are numerous places where she gives both the case and the media advocates far more credit for inventing advocacy strategies and changing the landscape than either deserves.”

22
Apr
2014

Jo Becker’s revisionist history on marriage

Proposition 8, Supreme Court, gay marriage, same-sex marriage, marriage equality, gay news, Washington Blade, Becker

(Washington Blade file photo by Michael Key)

Jo Becker’s book “Forcing the Spring,” which lauds the work of the American Foundation for Equal Rights has generated much debate in the LGBT community. Andrew Sullivan trashed the book and its author and claimed some major credit for himself in the fight for marriage equality.

Elizabeth Birch, former president of the Human Rights Campaign trashed Sullivan in her Huffington Post column. But they apparently agree on one thing: The book by Becker is far from an accurate history of the fight for marriage equality.

Reading the excerpt published in the New York Times, it was easy to accept both Sullivan and Birch were right even if their language was harsh. Michael Calderone in his Huffington Post piece quotes Sullivan’s comments on Becker’s book in which he said it is “truly toxic and morally repellent,” and that it includes instances of “jaw-dropping distortion” and statements “so wrong, so myopic and so ignorant it beggars belief that a respectable journalist could actually put it in print.” I guess Sullivan and Becker won’t be going for brunch anytime soon.

Birch calls Sullivan “insufferable,” and notes, “While it is true that the struggle for marriage equality predates the Proposition 8 case and its aftermath, it also predates Andrew Sullivan. (Did anyone else notice no less than four of Sullivan’s books are pushed in the opening paragraphs of his diatribe against the Prop 8 team? So much for collective credit).”

But why is anyone surprised that Sullivan thinks the world revolves around him? I remember his New York Times magazine cover story on the AIDS epidemic, “When Plagues End,” in 1996 when he declared the AIDS epidemic over because the new medications worked for him. The millions who have died and been infected since may not see themselves in the same light.

Both Sullivan and Birch offered strong statements about what was left out of Becker’s book and after reading the excerpt, I was left wondering how much money AFER paid her to write it. It clearly is not a history of the fight for gay marriage but rather a book trying to create heroes of a select few. This is not to denigrate the work of Chad Griffin or the actual work of attorneys who fought the Prop 8 fight or the real heroes of that fight, the couples who brought suit.

But in the excerpt (I haven’t read the full book) she portrays Ken Mehlman as a hero, glancing over his personal responsibility for the anti-gay rhetoric and devastating policies of the Bush administration. She never mentions that while Olsen was one of the lawyers for these couples he was at the same time supporting the Romney/Ryan ticket that was promising to repeal all gay rights advances and to appoint justices to the Supreme Court who would be guaranteed to rule against this case.

There are so many people and organizations deeply involved in the struggle for marriage equality. The fact is, the case brought by AFER to the Supreme Court was a partial victory instead of a possible total loss because Walter Dellinger, former acting solicitor general in the Clinton administration, submitted a brief offering the court what some called an “off-ramp.” It was his brief quoted in Chief Justice Roberts’ opinion that allowed the court to reject the case and return it to the Appellate Court in California where the ruling would only impact that state.

The Becker book apparently leaves out nearly all the activists who have spent a good part of their lives fighting for full human and civil rights for the LGBT community. Many have spent the years working for marriage equality that Mehlman and Olsen spent developing and supporting policies to prevent it.

From Hawaii, where the Supreme Court first ruled in 1993 that marriage equality was constitutional beginning the long fight there, to Massachusetts, which became the first state to legalize marriage equality in 2004; to Iowa that legalized it in 2009 to D.C., the fight for marriage was an effort by thousands. D.C. advocates spent 20 years preparing the stage and working to elect a City Council that would vote yes when the right time came. The question Becker says Griffin put to Obama about when he would “evolve” was asked by many others at those small $37,500 a couple fundraisers. I myself put him on the spot with the same question, and got the same answer, at one of those events on Sept. 30, 2011.

I hope that when marriage equality becomes a reality across the entire nation that someone will write the real history of the fight that won it. That book will be beneficial to future generations in a way that the Becker book will never be.

24
Apr
2014

Interpreting this week’s election results

Chris Christie, election, Republican National Convention, Republican Party, New Jersey

Gov. Chris Christie speaking at the 2012 Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla. (Blade file photo by Michael Key).

In politics, it’s always hard to read the tea leaves and determine what off-year elections mean. This year was especially difficult as we were coming off the government shutdown and the fiasco of the Obamacare website rollout. With many people around the nation thinking a pox on all your houses, there were still those who believed that some races could hold messages for both next year’s mid-term elections and even the 2016 presidential election. Looking at the results I am not sure they did.

On Tuesday, Democrats in Virginia had a good day. For the first time since 1974, Virginians elected a governor, Terry McAuliffe, from the same party as the president and it looks like they will sweep the top three offices including lieutenant governor and attorney general. The attorney general race is still up in the air and at the time I write this the Democrat is leading by about 500 votes but it appears there will be a mandated recount.

The GOP losses are a big defeat for the Tea Party. But many moderate Republicans had jumped ship in advance of the election and Ken Cuccinelli campaigned with Sens. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) and Rand Paul (R-Ken.), former Sen. Rick Santorum (R-Pa.) and local right-wing Rep. Eric Cantor (R-Va.) to no avail. It appears from exit polling that the health reform rollout kept the loss from being bigger.

New Jersey Republicans had a more moderate (though still pro-life, anti-union, and anti-gay marriage) candidate in Gov. Chris Christie. He soundly defeated the Democrat by more than 20 percent in a lopsided victory. According to the bloviators on CNN (Alex Castellanos, Andrew Sullivan and Newt Gingrich) Christie will use this big win to catapult him into contention for the Republican nomination in 2016. But many observers agree that Christie will have a hard time taking his brand of in-your-face bullying politics to Iowa and the South. Southerners tend to be more genteel even if they are trying to stab you in the back. While it appears to have been good for Christie’s re-election campaign in New Jersey to be seen with President Obama after Hurricane Sandy and on the stage with Bill Clinton at the Clinton Global initiative, that may not go over well with the ultra-conservative voters who still predominate in most of the Republican primaries.

Then there was the Republican primary race in Alabama. The day before the primary, Sean Sullivan wrote in a column for the Washington Post, “The long-running battle for the heart and soul of the national Republican Party will play out here on Tuesday in the form of a nasty little House special-election primary, pitting business-oriented establishment Republicans against angry and energized tea party insurgents who have become a dominant voice in the GOP.” This statement was made about the primary contest between the candidate of choice for the business community and more moderate Republicans, Bradley Byrne; and the Tea Party choice Dean Young. Byrne won and this may bode well as Sullivan suggested when he wrote, “A Byrne victory would lend momentum to an effort by the Republican establishment to wrest control of the GOP from the tea party faction, which has dominated the debate over the past three years. The battle is already on for other seats in 2014, including two in Michigan held by Reps. Justin Amash and Kerry Bentivolio, tea party favorites who have drawn primary challengers.”

Clearly this is a mixed bag for Republicans, with the Tea Party faithful saying that their candidates need to hold the line. Meanwhile, the Republican business community is setting the bar low for getting their support and endorsing candidates who simply say they are opposed to closing government and are willing to raise the debt ceiling.

It is always difficult to read much into off-year elections. McAuliffe was lucky that the government closing gave him momentum and that the Republicans put up the three most right-wing candidates ever nominated by the party in Virginia. Christie may be just a New Jersey phenomenon and a bully. Exit polling showed that even many of those who voted for him suggested they wouldn’t vote for him for president.

We will have to wait and see whether the issues of the government shutdown and the fiasco of the health care website rollout fade or continue to impact voters. That will depend on what Congress does in January with the budget and if the administration can fix the website and demonstrate that Obamacare really is as good as they claim.

07
Nov
2013

Sullivan launches own subscription site

Andrew Sullivan, gay news, Washington Blade, CATO Institute

Andrew Sullivan (Washington Blade file photo by Michael Key)

PROVINCETOWN, Mass. — Gay writer Andrew Sullivan announced in early January he was leaving Tina Brown’s The Daily Beast and launching his own paid subscription site.

Sullivan — a longtime Washington, D.C. resident who recently moved to New York City — left his longtime home of the Atlantic magazine in April 2011 for the Daily Beast. He has now informed his readers in a final Daily Beast post he and his staff were shifting to AndrewSullivan.com, which has a subscription model and no ads, raising more than $300,000 in subscriptions in the first week.

11
Jan
2013

Cooper discusses coming out

Anderson Cooper, CNN, gay news, Washington Blade

Anderson Cooper (Washington Blade photo by Michael Key)

ROME—Gay CNN anchor Anderson Cooper discussed his decision to come out with journalist Michelangelo Signorile on Monday.

“Being gay is a blessing,” Cooper told Signorile from the Italian capital where he is covering the papal conclave.

Cooper, one of America’s most prominent openly gay celebrities, who came out last July in a statement published on Andrew Sullivan’s blog, at the time at the Daily Beast, also discussed his brother’s 1988 suicide. He also spoke with Signorile about the award he is scheduled to receive at the 2013 GLAAD Media Awards in New York City on Saturday.

13
Mar
2013

Year in review: Blade publishes names of petition signers

(Washington Blade file photo by Michael Key)

(Washington Blade file photo by Michael Key)

The Washington Blade’s decision to publish the names of the more than 100,000 Marylanders who signed the petition that prompted the state’s same-sex marriage referendum sparked outrage among opponents of nuptials for gays and lesbians.

Family Research Council President Tony Perkins described this newspaper’s decision to publish the names of those who signed the petition as “nothing short of intimidation.” Matt Barber, vice president of Liberty Action Counsel, accused the Blade of “homo terrorism.” The Blade also received threatening phone calls and e-mails after it published the names on its website on July 12.

Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley told the Blade last month when asked about the controversy that he didn’t know whether “I’m qualified to comment on journalistic ethics.” Transgender activist Dana Beyer also questioned the Blade’s decision to publish the names of those who signed the petition that were publicly available on July 12, but gay columnist Andrew Sullivan defended the Blade.

“Some argue that this is a tool for intimidation or a violation of privacy,” he wrote. “I’m afraid I cannot see that. Signing a political petition is a public act. If you are ashamed of trying to deny your fellow citizens their civil rights, you probably shouldn’t have signed the petition in the first place.”

Opponents of the same-sex marriage law eventually collected more than 160,000 signatures that prompted a Nov. 6 referendum on the issue. Maryland voters upheld the statute that O’Malley signed in March by a 52-48 percent margin.

27
Dec
2012