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Brown maintains fundraising edge in Md. gubernatorial race

Heather Mizeur, Maryland, Anthony Brown, Doug Gansler, gay news, Washington Blade

The three leading Maryland Democratic gubernatorial candidates held their first televised debate on May 8 at the University of Maryland. (Photo courtesy of the Washington Post)

Maryland Lieutenant Gov. Anthony Brown continues to maintain a significant fundraising advantage over his challengers ahead of next month’s Democratic gubernatorial primary.

Brown and his running mate, Howard County Executive Ken Ulman, raised $1,236,156.40 between the end of the legislative session on April 8 and May 20, according to their latest campaign finance report they filed with state officials on Wednesday. The two men reported they have raised more than $11 million during the 2014 election cycle.

The two men reported slightly less than $4.15 million on hand.

“Maryland families are united behind Anthony Brown and Ken Ulman’s plan to build a better Maryland for more Marylanders by establishing universal pre-kindergarten, building the most competitive business climate and expanding job training for our workers,” said Brown and Ulman’s campaign manager, Justin Schall.

Attorney General Doug Gansler and his running mate, state Del. Jolene Ivey (D-Prince George’s County), reported they raised $311,970.08 between April 8 and May 20. The candidates reported slightly more than $3.1 million on hand.

“Doug has continued to raise money from supporters at a steady clip in the last six weeks, and with more than $3 million in the bank and less than a month before the primary, we have the resources needed to win this race,” said campaign spokesperson Katie Hill.

State Del. Heather Mizeur (D-Montgomery County) and her running mate, Rev. Delman Coates, raised $194,309.28 that includes matching funds during the latest filing period. They reported slightly more than $960,000 on hand.

The Baltimore Sun reported that Larry Hogan, who was a member of former Gov. Bob Ehrlich’s administration, raised roughly $538,000 since January and has nearly $390,000 in cash on hand.

Harford County Executive David Craig and state Del. Jeannie Haddaway-Riccio (R-Caroline, Dorchester, Talbot and Wicomico Counties) reported they raised $146,717.98 during the latest campaign finance period. Former congressional candidate Charles Lollar reported he raised nearly $55,000 since his last report he filed with state election officials in January.

State Del. Ron George (R-Anne Arundel County) did not raise any money during this reporting period.

A poll conducted by WPA Opinion Research between May 6-7 indicates 34 percent of respondents would vote for Brown in the June 24 primary, compared to 20 percent who support Gansler and 7 percent who back Mizeur. A St. Mary’s College poll conducted between April 10-13 found Brown ahead of Gansler by a 27-11 percent margin with slightly less than 8 percent of respondents saying they support Mizeur.

WBFF in Baltimore on Tuesday hosted a debate between Gansler and Mizeur that Brown did not attend. Bruce DePuyt of News Channel 8 earlier in the day hosted a separate debate between the candidates’ running mates.

Brown, Gansler and Mizeur took part in their first televised debate on May 8 that took place at the University of Maryland. The three candidates are expected to square off two more times before the June 24 primary.

29
May
2014

Maryland to recognize Utah same-sex marriages

Doug Gansler, gay news, Washington Blade

Maryland Attorney General Doug Gansler (Washington Blade file photo by Michael Key)

Maryland Attorney General Doug Gansler on Friday said his state would recognize same-sex marriages performed in Utah.

“Maryland will continue to recognize valid out-of-state same-sex marriages as we continue to strengthen the Constitution’s promise of equal protection under the law,” said Gansler. “It is an affront to the idea of basic human rights that the battle for full marriage equality in this country remains in headlines and courtrooms.”

Gansler told the Washington Blade his office on Thursday received a call from a gay Maryland couple who married in Utah about whether the state would recognize their union.

Human Rights Campaign President Chad Griffin on the same day urged him and attorneys general in the 17 other states that have extended marriage rights to gays and lesbians to recognize the marriages of the more than 1,300 same-sex couples who exchanged vows after U.S. District Court Judge Robert Shelby struck down the Beehive State’s gay nuptials ban. The U.S. Supreme Court on Jan. 6 blocked any future same-sex marriages from taking place in Utah until the case is resolved.

“Should any of these couples be residents of, travel through, or relocate to your state, there is simply no reason to treat their marriage differently from any other,” wrote Griffin.

HRC spokesperson Fred Sainz described Gansler’s announcement to the Blade as “another win for justice, dignity and equality.”

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder earlier on Friday announced the federal government will recognize same-sex marriages performed in Utah between Dec. 20 and Jan. 6. This announcement came two days after Utah Gov. Gary Herbert said his state would not recognize the aforementioned unions pending the outcome of his administration’s appeal of Shelby’s ruling.

Gansler in 2008 became the first statewide official to back marriage rights for same-sex couples in Maryland when he testified in support of gay nuptials during a state Senate committee hearing. He wrote an opinion in 2010 that said Maryland would recognize same-sex marriages legally performed in other jurisdictions.

“We’ve just said of course based on our previous opinion, we of course would welcome those couples here,” Gansler told the Blade. “Public policy would dictate that least in those 18 states (in which nuptials for gays and lesbians are legal) the marriages from Utah would be recognized.”

Gansler added he hopes the Supreme Court will agree to hear the Utah case and determine whether the denial of marriage rights to same-sex couples is constitutional.

“The hope is that this Utah case would be taken at the Supreme Court, which issued the injunction,” he told the Blade. “Staying the decision is indication the Supreme Court would take the case and finally put to rest the issue of whether or not the prohibition of same-sex marriage is constitutional. And clearly it’s not.”

Gansler is currently running to succeed Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley.

He will face Lieutenant Gov. Anthony Brown and state Del. Heather Mizeur (D-Montgomery County) in the Democratic primary in June.

10
Jan
2014

Delman Coates: We’re running ‘on making a difference’

Delman Coates, Maryland, gay news, Washington Blade

Rev. Delman Coates (Washington Blade photo by Michael Key)

CLINTON, Md. — Hundreds of people had already taken their seats inside the sprawling Mt. Ennon Baptist Church in Prince George’s County on May 28 for a concert to celebrate Rev. Delman Coates’ 10th anniversary as the congregation’s senior pastor as he began to make his way toward the sanctuary.

A church employee nervously tried to shield Coates from any surprises that might have been planned for him as he greeted some of his congregants. Staff and volunteers cheerfully spoke with him before he returned to his office to talk about his decision to become state Del. Heather Mizeur (D-Montgomery County)’s running mate in her gubernatorial campaign.

“I’ve been fully content with my work as a clergy leader in this community, across the state and around the country,” Coates told the Washington Blade. “It’s not something that I imagined and so I was really honored when Heather approached me about partnering with her.”

Coates spoke with the Blade 27 days before Mizeur faces Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown and Attorney General Doug Gansler in the Democratic gubernatorial primary.

He repeatedly stressed to the Blade that he and Mizeur had already worked together on a number of issues before she first approached him last summer to become her running mate. These include reducing foreclosure rates in Prince George’s County that remain the highest in the state and opposing the expansion of gaming in the state.

Coates — whose church has 8,000 members — in 2012 testified in support of a same-sex marriage bill that Gov. Martin O’Malley ultimately signed. The Prince George’s County pastor later played a prominent role in the campaign supporting the law ahead of a referendum on it.

Rev. Delman Coates, Rev. Al Sharpton, clergy united for marriage equality

Rev. Delman Coates (center) joined Rev. Al Sharpton and other black clergy at a D.C. press conference in 2012 held to highlight their support of Maryland’s same-sex marriage law. (Washington Blade photo by Michael Key)

“I led on marriage equality as a Prince Georgian, as a black Baptist pastor in Prince George’s County when it wasn’t popular in some quarters,” said Coates. “I led on the issue at a time when others did not.”

Equality Maryland late last year endorsed Brown’s gubernatorial campaign in an apparent snub of Mizeur.

Coates told the Blade he was “not able to comment” on the role Brown played in the campaign to secure marriage rights for same-sex couples in the state. The Prince George’s County pastor did say that many of his colleagues told him he had “committed professional suicide” when he testified in support of the gay nuptials bill.

Coates said more than 1,000 people joined his church in 2012.

“It’s convenient after the fact to say I supported an issue,” he said. “We were clear leaders — visible, vocal and unapologetic leaders on the question of marriage and I continue to be nationally.”

Wife, children ‘fully invested’ in campaign

Coates told the Blade that he spoke with his pastor, Rev. Cynthia L. Hale of the Ray of Hope Christian Church in suburban Atlanta, and former New York Congressman Floyd Flake, whose Jamaica, N.Y., church has 23,000 members, before he agreed to become Mizeur’s running mate. He said he and his wife of 18 years, Yolanda, also spoke with Flake and his wife about balancing his responsibilities to his church with the demands of a statewide political campaign.

Coates said his four children who range in age from 4 to 11 are “really excited” about the campaign.

“They’re really excited about what’s happening,” he said. “They’ve been fully invested; my wife as well.”

Mizeur and Coates have championed a number of progressive issues during the campaign.

The Montgomery County Democrat last November announced she supports the legalization of marijuana as a way to fund early childhood education in Maryland. The ticket also backs raising the state’s minimum wage to $16.70 an hour by 2022 and reinstating the so-called “millionaire’s tax” that Mizeur argues will allow for an income tax cut for middle class Marylanders.

She is also the first gubernatorial candidate in 20 years to accept public campaign funds.

“We need elected officials who are going to be accountable to the voters,” Coates told the Blade. “This issue of accountability is really why I felt it was important to join Heather.”

Mizeur would also become the country’s first openly gay governor if voters in November elect her to succeed O’Malley who is term-limited.

“We’re not running on making history,” said Coates. “We’re running on making a difference for the state of Maryland, but the idea of a black Baptist minister partnering politically with an openly gay member of the state legislature is a compelling national narrative. It dispels the myth that is often told about the relationship between blacks and gays that really fuels this presupposition that African Americans, African-American people of faith are opposed to LGBT equality.”

Coates: I believe in separation of church and state

Mizeur and Coates have received high marks during recent debates, but they continue to face questions about their viability as a ticket with recent polls showing they trail Brown and Gansler going into the June 24 primary.

Their first television ad debuted on Tuesday — and they hope to court the significant amount of undecided voters that remain during the campaign’s final weeks.

“Whenever we have the opportunity to be heard, they’re supporting our message, our vision for the state of Maryland,” Coates told the Blade.

Coates has also faced questions from some progressives and even other people of faith about whether a pastor should run for statewide office.

Democrats and LGBT rights advocates repeatedly criticized E.W. Jackson, a minister who unsuccessfully sought to become Virginia’s next lieutenant governor in 2013, over anti-gay statements he made that include comparing gay men to pedophiles and describing them as “very sick people.” Jackson also reportedly said during a speech at a Shenandoah County church last September that he disagreed with Pope Francis’ suggestion the Roman Catholic Church has grown “obsessed” with same-sex marriage, abortion and contraception.

“I’m a progressive,” Coates told the Blade. “I really believe in the separation of church and state.”

Coates noted he recently met with one of the men who filed a lawsuit against the Carroll County Board of Commissioners last year over its decision to open each of their meetings with a prayer.

“I affirmed his effort there,” he said. “I’m a progressive Christian. I believe that what makes America so great is that people have freedom of and from religion. And it’s a value that I affirm.”

Mizeur on Tuesday described Coates as “one of the great civil rights leaders of our state” during a telephone interview.

“He is a social justice advocate that has the courage of his convictions to stand up on a range of progressive priorities for helping Maryland live up to her full potential,” she said. “He’s just the total package that I was looking for to be the perfect teammate for me in this journey.”

Mizeur also responded to questions about whether a pastor such as Coates should run for statewide office.

“What he does on Sundays is one job and what he will do all the other days of the week is another job,” she told the Blade.

Heather Mizeur, Deborah Mizeur, Delman Coates, gay news, Washington Blade

Maryland gubernatorial candidate Heather Mizeur last November named Delman Coates (on right) as her running mate during a campaign rally in Silver Spring. (Washington Blade photo by Michael Key)

04
Jun
2014

Gansler: Equality Maryland ‘traded’ Brown endorsement for trans bill support

Doug Gansler, gay news, Washington Blade

Maryland Attorney General Doug Gansler (Washington Blade file photo by Michael Key)

Attorney General Doug Gansler told the Washington Blade last week that Equality Maryland “traded” its endorsement of Lieutenant Gov. Anthony Brown for governor for his support of a bill that would ban discrimination against transgender Marylanders.

Gansler told the Blade during a Jan. 10 telephone interview that Brown should “honor” the Equality Maryland endorsement by making the trans rights measure an administration bill as Gov. Martin O’Malley did in 2012 when he designated the same-sex marriage bill a legislative priority. Gansler – who is running against Brown and state Del. Heather Mizeur in the Democratic gubernatorial primary in June – further stressed he feels the bill would have “a stronger chance of becoming law” this year if the lieutenant governor did so.

“That would be sort of putting his money where his mouth is,” said Gansler. “If it’s not an administration bill, I just don’t know.”

All three gubernatorial candidates have pledged to testify in support of the trans rights bill in Annapolis. O’Malley, along with Brown’s running mate, Howard County Executive Ken Ulman, are also expected to speak for the measure that state Sen. Rich Madaleno (D-Montgomery County) is set to introduce in the coming days.

Gansler’s running mate, state Del. Jolene Ivey (D-Prince George’s County), and Mizeur co-sponsored a 2011 trans rights measure that passed in the House of Delegates.

“The three Democratic candidates for governor indicated strong support for the Fairness for All Marylanders Act, both on their questionnaires and during their interviews,” Equality Maryland Executive Director Carrie Evans told the Blade late on Sunday. “All three told us they would help pass this bill. None of them indicated their support or help was going to change based on our endorsement decisions.”

Brown’s campaign manager, Justin Schall, blasted Gansler’s comments.

“The leaders of Equality Maryland are dedicated, honest people and this unfounded accusation by Gansler is incredibly disrespectful of their process and the integrity of their organization,” Schall told the Blade on Monday. “Anthony Brown is, and has always been, a strong supporter of equality and justice because it’s the right thing to do.”

13
Jan
2014

Gansler turns up heat in Md. gubernatorial race

Heather Mizeur, Maryland, Anthony Brown, Doug Gansler, gay news, Washington Blade

Attorney General Doug Gansler will face Lieutenant Gov. Anthony Brown and state Del. Heather Mizeur (D-Montgomery County) in the June 24 primary. (Photo courtesy of the Washington Post)

Attorney General Doug Gansler this week attacked Lieutenant Gov. Anthony Brown’s record on LGBT rights ahead of the June 24 Democratic gubernatorial primary.

Gansler repeatedly described Brown’s support for the same-sex marriage and transgender rights bills that Gov. Martin O’Malley signed in 2012 and last month respectively as “lukewarm” during an interview with the Washington Blade on Monday.

The attorney general questioned whether the lieutenant governor voted for the same-sex marriage law when it went before voters in a 2012 referendum. Gansler acknowledged that Brown testified in support of the trans rights bill in March, but suggested he could have done more.

“There’s the public and then there’s the behind the scenes,” said Gansler. “My understanding [is] he really didn’t lift a finger to help except show up that one day to testify.”

Brown defended his record in support of same-sex marriage during an interview with the Blade on Monday.

He stressed he worked with LGBT rights advocates to raise money for the 2012 campaign to defend the gay nuptials law at the ballot box. Brown pointed out to the Blade that he discussed his support for the issue during his first national television interview with MSNBC the year before.

Brown noted he also opposed efforts to define marriage as between a man and a woman while in the Maryland House of Delegates after gays and lesbians began to legally tie the knot in Massachusetts in 2004.

“We’re in the last week of an election and there’s a lot of comments that I think reveal desperation and a distortion or manipulation of the truth,” he said. “I can tell you that my commitment to marriage equality was long standing.”

Brown also reiterated his support for the trans rights bill, noting he spoke with “a number” of lawmakers and “coordinated my efforts with” Equality Maryland. He told the Blade he could not recall any specific conversations he may have had with state Sen. C. Anthony Muse (D-Prince George’s County) and other lawmakers who had previously voted against similar measures.

“I said identify for me where you think I could be most helpful,” said Brown, referring to his work with Equality Maryland to advance the bill. “It was all based on what we thought was the best strategy to try to get the votes and the support we needed.”

Gansler says Equality Maryland ‘traded’ Brown endorsement

Gansler also told the Blade he still believes Equality Maryland “traded” its endorsement of Brown for his support of the trans rights bill.

“That is what we were told,” Gansler told the Blade. “They endorsed somebody who did absolutely nothing on the issue of marriage equality. He took no steps in advancing the cause of marriage equality or any other LGBT rights [issue] as far as I can tell. He was visibly uncomfortable talking about the issue.”

Equality Maryland Executive Director Carrie Evans described Gansler’s claim as an “unfounded” and “untrue accusation.”

She noted the attorney general during his “on the record” interview with the Equality Maryland Political Action Committee last year questioned whether Brown voted for the same-sex marriage law during the 2012 referendum.

“The interview team was shocked to hear Gansler insinuate this and agreed that it did not bode well for Gansler’s ability to restrain himself and carry himself with integrity and dignity as our governor,” Evans told the Blade. “Moreover, for him to insinuate, twice, that Equality Maryland traded our endorsement for Brown’s support of [the Fairness for All Marylanders Act] is insulting.”

Gansler also told the Blade in response to a question about state Del. Heather Mizeur (D-Montgomery County)’s plan to legalize marijuana in Maryland that the Montgomery County Democrat is “not seen as a viable candidate in terms of the election.” He further suggested that a Republican could become Maryland’s next governor in November if Brown wins the Democratic primary because of his tax proposals.

“Voters want to hear about the issues, and are tired of these personal, baseless attacks from our opponents,” Mizeur’s campaign manager, Joanna Belanger, told the Blade on Tuesday. “That’s why Heather continues to see momentum as she runs a positive campaign focused on the issues that matter most to Maryland families and seniors.”

Gansler questioning Brown’s record on marriage rights for same-sex couples and trans rights comes as all three leading Democratic gubernatorial candidates continue to court LGBT voters ahead of next Tuesday’s primary.

The attorney general noted to the Blade that in 2008 he became the first statewide official in Maryland to back marriage rights for same-sex couples when he testified before a state Senate committee. State Del. Don Dwyer (R-Anne Arundel County) later tried to impeach him over the issue.

Gansler in 2010 wrote an opinion that said Maryland would recognize same-sex marriages legally performed in other jurisdictions.

“I’ve never understood the arguments against marriage equality, so I thought it was the right thing to do,” said Gansler. “That’s why I ran for office; to stand up for things that I thought were unfair or unjust.”

Gansler submitted testimony in support of the trans rights bill. His running mate, state Del. Jolene Ivey (D-Prince George’s County), co-sponsored an identical measure in the House of Delegates that state Del. Luke Clippinger (D-Baltimore City) introduced.

Mizeur, who could become the first openly gay governor in the country if she wins the general election in November, earlier this year testified in support of the trans rights bill before the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee.

She and her running mate, Rev. Delman Coates of Mt. Ennon Baptist Church in Prince George’s County, who testified in support of same-sex marriage in 2012, marched in the annual Baltimore Pride Parade on Saturday. Brown’s running mate, Howard County Executive Ken Ulman, also took part in the event.

“[Coates] and I are focused on not making history, but making a difference,” Mizeur told the Blade during an interview earlier this month. “Delman and I are the representation to the end of identity politics that divides communities.”

Campaign finance reports indicate that Brown continues to maintain a significant fundraising edge over Gansler and Mizeur, who has accepted public campaign funds. Polls also show the lieutenant governor has a double-digit lead over his two Democratic rivals ahead of the primary.

Frosh a ‘firm ally’

The outcome of a number of other statewide and local races will likely be determined in the June 24 Democratic primary.

State Sen. Brian Frosh (D-Montgomery County) will face state Dels. Jon Cardin (D-Baltimore County) and Aisha Braveboy (D-Prince George’s County) in the race to succeed Gansler as attorney general.

Equality Maryland in April endorsed Frosh, noting the role that Evans said he played in securing passage of the trans rights bill in the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee. Cardin earlier this year introduced a bill that sought to ban “ex-gay” conversion therapy to minors in the state.

“Brian Frosh has been a firm ally and leader on LGBT issues in the General Assembly,” said Evans. “He has the maturity, experience and commitment to be an effective advocate for the LGBT communities of Maryland as our next attorney general.”

State Sen. Rich Madaleno (D-Montgomery County) will square off against Gender Rights Maryland Executive Director Dana Beyer in the 18th Senate District that includes Chevy Chase, Wheaton, Kensington and portions of Silver Spring and Bethesda.

George Zokle is running to represent House District 20 that includes Takoma Park and Silver Spring. Kevin Walling, Equality Maryland’s director of communications and development from 2008-2010 — a period when the organization faced serious financial difficulties — dropped his bid to represent House District 16 that includes Bethesda and Potomac.

The Gay and Lesbian Victory Fund endorsed both men, along with Madaleno.

18
Jun
2014

Maryland transgender rights bill introduced

Rich Madaleno, Maryland, Democratic Party, Montgomery County, gay news, Washington Blade

Maryland State. Sen. Rich Madaleno

State Sen. Rich Madaleno (D-Montgomery County) on Tuesday introduced a bill that would ban discrimination against transgender Marylanders.

State Sens. Brian Frosh (D-Montgomery County), the chair of the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee who is running for attorney general, and Robert Zirkin (D-Baltimore County) are among the 25 senators who have co-sponsored the measure. State Del. Luke Clippinger (D-Baltimore City) plans to bring forth the bill in the House of Delegates where it passed in 2011.

The Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee last March by a 6-5 vote margin struck down an identical bill that Madaleno and state Sen. Jamie Raskin (D-Montgomery County) introduced that would have banned anti-trans discrimination in housing, employment and public accommodation. State Sens. Norman Stone (D-Baltimore County), C. Anthony Muse (D-Prince George’s County) and James Brochin (D-Baltimore County) voted against the measure.

Senate President Thomas V. “Mike” Miller (D-Prince George’s and Calvert Counties) state Sen. Katherine Klausmeier (D-Baltimore County) support the bill. House Speaker Michael Busch (D-Anne Arundel County) also backs the measure.

Governor Martin O’Malley and the three Democrats who are running to succeed him — Lieutenant Gov. Anthony Brown, Attorney General Doug Gansler and state Del. Heather Mizeur (D-Montgomery County) — are expected to testify in support of the bill. Brown’s running mate, Howard County Executive Ken Ulman, has also pledged to speak for the measure in Annapolis.

“No one should face discrimination on the basis of gender identity,” Mizeur told the Washington Blade last week. “Equality in Maryland shouldn’t have to wait this long.”

Both Mizeur and Gansler’s running mate, state Del. Jolene Ivey (D-Prince George’s County), co-sponsored the 2011 trans rights bill in the House of Delegates.

“Inequality anywhere should be recognized as wrong for anybody,” Gansler told the Washington Blade during a Jan. 10 telephone interview. “Inequality for any person is inequality for all of us.”

Gender Rights Maryland Executive Director Dana Beyer welcomed the introduction of the bill.

“I’m glad to see that this year’s gender identity bill is now in play and we are all looking forward to an expedited hearing in the [Senate] Judicial Proceedings Committee,” she told the Blade. “With strong support in both the Senate and House, as well as from senior leadership, the administration and all the Democratic gubernatorial candidates, the time has come to finally move the bill from the Senate committee to the floor.”

The bill remains a legislative priority for Equality Maryland, the state’s largest LGBT advocacy group, after voters in 2012 approved the Free State’s same-sex marriage law.

Gansler told the Blade the organization “traded” its endorsement of Brown for governor last month for his support of the trans rights bill. Gansler said the measure would have “a stronger chance of becoming law” this year if the lieutenant governor made it an administrative bill as O’Malley did when he made the same-sex marriage bill a legislative priority in 2012.

“That would be sort of putting his money where his mouth is,” said Gansler. “If it’s not an administration bill, I just don’t know.”

Baltimore City and Baltimore, Montgomery and Howard Counties have already added gender identity and expression to their non-discrimination laws. Hyattsville last month became the first jurisdiction in Prince George’s County to pass a trans-inclusive anti-discrimination ordinance.

Neighboring Delaware is among the 17 states along with D.C. and Puerto Rico that include gender identity and expression in their anti-discrimination laws. Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett last month announced his support of a bill that would ban anti-LGBT discrimination in the Keystone State.

14
Jan
2014

Brown remains frontrunner as Marylanders head to polls

Heather Mizeur, Maryland, Anthony Brown, Doug Gansler, gay news, Washington Blade

Lieutenant Gov. Anthony Brown remains the clear frontrunner in the Maryland gubernatorial race going into Tuesday’s primary. (Photo courtesy of the Washington Post)

Maryland voters on Tuesday will go to the polls in their state’s primary election.

Lieutenant Gov. Anthony Brown, who remains the frontrunner in the race to succeed Gov. Martin O’Malley, will face off against Attorney General Doug Gansler and lesbian state Del. Heather Mizeur (D-Montgomery County) in the Democratic gubernatorial primary.

Larry Hogan, who was a member of former Gov. Bob Ehrlich’s administration, will face Harford County Executive David Craig in the Republican gubernatorial primary. The two men will also square off against state Del. Ron George (R-Anne Arundel County) and former congressional candidate Charles Lollar.

State Sen. Brian Frosh (D-Montgomery County) will face state Dels. Jon Cardin (D-Baltimore County) and Aisha Braveboy (D-Prince George’s County) in the Democratic primary for attorney general. The winner will face Towson lawyer Jeffrey Pritzker in the general election.

State Sen. Rich Madaleno (D-Montgomery County), who’s gay, will face Gender Rights Maryland Executive Director Dana Beyer, a longtime trans activist, in the 18th Senate District that includes Chevy Chase, Wheaton, Kensington and portions of Silver Spring and Bethesda. George Zokle is running to represent House District 20 that includes Takoma Park and Silver Spring.

Spencer Dove seeks to represent House District 32 that includes portions of Anne Arundel County.

Equality Maryland, the state’s largest LGBT advocacy group, late last year backed Brown with an endorsement that was an apparent snub of Mizeur who could be the country’s first openly LGBT governor if she succeeds O’Malley in November. The organization has also endorsed Frosh, Madaleno and Dove in their respective races.

The Gay and Lesbian Victory Fund also endorsed Madaleno, along with Zokle and Dove.

The group did not back Mizeur.

Polls are open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m.

24
Jun
2014

Brown tops Gansler in latest Md. fundraising report

Anthony Brown, Diane Stollenwerk, Maggie McIntosh, Mary Washington, Ken Ulman, Maryland, gay news, Washington Blade

From left: Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, Diane Stollenwerk, Del. Maggie McIntosh, Del. Mary Washington and Howard County Executive Ken Ulman. (Photo by Sam O’Neil)

Maryland gubernatorial candidate Anthony Brown has developed a significant fundraising advantage over his Democratic challengers in the race to succeed Gov. Martin O’Malley.

Brown and his running mate, Howard County Executive Ken Ulman, raised nearly $5.4 million between Jan. 10, 2013, and Jan. 8, according to their latest campaign finance report they filed with state officials on Wednesday. This figure includes a $250 contribution Equality Maryland’s PAC made on Jan. 6 — less than two weeks after the statewide LGBT advocacy group endorsed Brown and Ulman.

Brown and Ulman, who ended his own gubernatorial bid last spring after Brown tapped him as his running mate, had slightly more than $7 million on hand at the end of the reporting period.

Attorney General Doug Gansler and his running mate, state Del. Jolene Ivey (D-Prince George’s County), reported they raised nearly $1.7 million during the same period. They reported they have slightly more than $6.2 million in the bank.

State Del. Heather Mizeur (D-Montgomery County) reported she and her running mate, Rev. Delman Coates, raised more than $1.1 million between Jan. 10, 2013, and Jan. 8. This figure includes slightly more than $284,359 in public funds the campaign has thus far received.

Mizeur and Coates’ campaign finance report indicates they had slightly more than $747,000 on hand at the end of the latest reporting period.

“I’m grateful for this tremendous outpouring of support from people who share our vision of a better Maryland for more Marylanders,” said Brown in a statement, noting education remains among his top priorities. “With a successful 2013 under our belt and growing momentum, we look forward to a busy and productive legislative session to build a better Maryland for more Marylanders.”

Gansler campaign spokesperson Bob Wheelock said the latest finance reports indicate the attorney general “has the resources and the record to not just win this race, but build the best Maryland for everyone.” Wheelock also criticized Brown and Ulman for reporting joint fundraising totals eight days after the start of the current legislative session during which lawmakers and elected statewide officials cannot accept campaign contributions under Maryland law.

“Their report of joint fundraising totals shows the mockery they are making of the ban on fundraising,” said Wheelock.

Joanna Belanger, campaign manager for Mizeur, said the Montgomery County Democrat’s report shows Marylanders are “responding” to her ticket’s message.

“We have a committed army of volunteers, grassroots donors and supporters who want to spread the word and ensure that Maryland families are number one in Annapolis next year,” said Belanger.

A Gonzales Research and Marketing Strategies poll conducted last October indicates 41 percent of likely Democratic voters would vote for Brown in the June 24 primary, compared to 21 percent who support Gansler and 5 percent who back Mizeur. A third of respondents said they were undecided.

Republican gubernatorial candidates reported they raised far less money during the latest reporting period than their Democratic counterparts.

Harford County Executive David Craig raised nearly $250,000 between Jan. 10, 2013, and Jan. 8. He reported a bank balance of slightly less than $155,000.

State Del. Ron George (R-Anne Arundel County) reported he raised slightly more than $130,000 during the same period and had $15,449.89 in his campaign bank account.

Former congressional candidate Charles Lollar raised about $65,000 between Nov. 27, 2012, and Jan. 8. His campaign finance report indicates he had only $5,731.35 on hand at the end of the reporting period.

State Sen. Brian Frosh (D-Montgomery County) reported his campaign to succeed Gansler as attorney general had slightly more than $795,000 on hand at the end of the latest filing period. State Dels. Jon Cardin (D-Baltimore County), Bill Frick (D-Montgomery County) and Aisha Braveboy (D-Prince George’s County) reported slightly more than $374,000, $133,000 and $9,200 respectively.

Kevin Walling, a gay former Equality Maryland staffer who hopes to represent portions of Montgomery County in the House of Delegates, raised slightly more than $37,000 from when he formally declared his candidacy last June to Jan. 8. He reported he had nearly $31,000 on hand at the end of the reporting period.

16
Jan
2014

Anthony Brown wins Md. Democratic gubernatorial primary

Heather Mizeur, Maryland, Anthony Brown, Doug Gansler, gay news, Washington Blade

Lieutenant Gov. Anthony Brown on Tuesday won the Maryland Democratic gubernatorial race. (Photo courtesy of the Washington Post)

BALTIMORE — Lieutenant Gov. Anthony Brown on Tuesday easily won the Maryland Democratic gubernatorial primary.

With 1884 of 1988 precincts reporting, Brown defeated Attorney General Doug Gansler by a 51-24 percent margin. State Del. Heather Mizeur (D-Montgomery County) came in third with 22 percent of the vote.

“In November, Marylanders will have a real choice between returning to the failed Republican policies of record spending and corporate tax giveaways, or standing with us as we write the next chapter in Maryland by strengthening middle-class families and growing our economy,” said Brown in a statement he issued along with his running mate, Howard County Executive Ken Ulman.

Outgoing Gov. Martin O’Malley said in a message his political action committee sent out shortly after the Associated Press projected Brown had won that he and the lieutenant governor “worked together” to raise the state’s minimum wage, secure marriage rights for same-sex couples, extend in-state tuition to undocumented immigrants and “pass common sense gun safety legislation.”

“There’s no one better to continue our progress and lead Maryland into the future,” said O’Malley.

Gansler and his running mate, state Del. Jolene Ivey (D-Prince George’s County), addressed supporters at the Bethesda North Marriott in Bethesda.

Mizeur, who could have been the country’s first openly LGBT governor if she had won the primary, became emotional at times as she spoke at the Maryland Historical Society in Baltimore. Her wife, Deborah Mizeur, her parents and running mate, Rev. Delman Coates of Mt. Ennon Baptist Church in Clinton, joined her on the stage as she thanked her supporters.

“Our journey hasn’t ended,” said Mizeur.

The Montgomery Democrat who is not seeking another term in the Maryland House of Delegates said she would support Brown going into the general election.

“I would be his partner in ensuring his victory in November,” she said.

Larry Hogan, who was a member of former Gov. Bob Ehrlich’s administration, easily defeated three challengers in the Republican gubernatorial primary. He will face off against Brown in the November.

Brown raised nearly four times as much money as Gansler during the lengthy and often contentious campaign.

Mizeur, whose platform included a plan to legalize marijuana as a way to fund universal preschool in the state, was the first gubernatorial candidate since 1994 to accept public campaign funds.

Brown and Gansler exchanged increasingly pointed attacks against each other during the final weeks of the campaign. These include the attorney general last week reiterating his previous claim that Equality Maryland “traded” its endorsement of the lieutenant governor for his support of a transgender rights bill that O’Malley signed into law in May.

“The Equality Maryland PAC is delighted that Democratic voters have chosen Anthony Brown and Ken Ulman for the nomination for governor,” said Equality Maryland Executive Director Carrie Evans in a statement. “The Brown/Ulman administration will work hard to ensure we keep moving forward on issues of importance to the LGBT communities of Maryland.”

Frosh, Madaleno win primaries

State Sen. Brian Frosh (D-Montgomery County) defeated state Del. Jon Cardin (D-Baltimore County) in the Democratic primary for attorney general by a 48-31 percent margin. State Del. Aisha Braveboy (D-Prince George’s County) came in third with 21 percent of the vote.

Frosh will face Towson lawyer Jeffrey Pritzker in the general election.

“I can’t express how thankful I am to Maryland voters,” said Frosh on Twitter after he won his primary. “We look forward to keep going forward.”

State Sen. Rich Madaleno (D-Montgomery County) easily defeated Gender Rights Maryland Executive Director Dana Beyer by a 63-37 percent margin in Senate District 18.

“I am pleased with the victory and look forward to working to make Maryland a more prosperous, fair and welcoming place for everyone,” Madaleno told the Washington Blade.

Beyer in a statement wished Madaleno “all the best as he continues to represent our district in Annapolis.”

“I enjoyed the competition, and I hope this campaign leads to bigger and better things for the residents of Montgomery County over the next four years,” she said. “We are faced with daunting problems, and must remain steadfast to overcome them and create a more perfect union.”

The race between Beyer and Madaleno in recent weeks became increasingly heated as they attacked each other over their role in securing passage of the trans rights bill the incumbent Montgomery County Democrat introduced in the Maryland Senate earlier this year. Equality Maryland, who endorsed Madaleno, also criticized Beyer, who is a former member of the organization’s board of directors.

“We are proud of the voters in District 18, who rejected the slanderous tactics of Dana Beyer and overwhelming re-elected Senator Rich Madaleno,” said Evans.

Gay state Dels. Ann Kaiser (D-Montgomery County), Bonnie Cullison (D-Montgomery County), Maggie McIntosh (D-Baltimore City), Mary Washington (D-Baltimore City) and Luke Clippinger (D-Baltimore City) all won their respective primaries. State Del. Peter Murphy (D-Charles County) won the Democratic primary in the race for president of the Charles County Commission.

Spencer Dove and George Zokle lost their Democratic primaries in House Districts 32 and 20 respectively. Jonathan Shurberg, chair of Gender Rights Maryland’s Legislative Committee, also lost in the Democratic primary in House District 20.

State Del. Don Dwyer (R-Anne Arundel County), an anti-gay incumbent who pleaded guilty last October to two drunken boating and driving charges, lost the Republican primary in House District 31.

All eight members of Maryland’s Congressional delegation won their respective primaries.

Reports indicate that turnout was low throughout the state.

25
Jun
2014

Maryland Senate committee holds hearing on transgender rights bill

Heather Mizeur, Maryland, House of Delegates, Annapolis, SB 212, transgender, gay news, Washington Blade

State Del. Heather Mizeur (D-Montgomery County) on Tuesday testified in support of a transgender rights bill. (Washington Blade photo by Michael Key)

ANNAPOLIS, Md.—Maryland lawmakers on Tuesday held a hearing on a bill that would ban anti-transgender discrimination in the state.

Members of the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee heard testimony from supporters and opponents of Senate Bill 212 that state Sen. Rich Madaleno (D-Montgomery County) introduced last month. The measure would ban discrimination based on gender identity and expression in employment, housing, public accommodation and credit.

“At its core, SB 212 is about securing basic civil rights for transgender Marylanders: the right to a job, a place to live and fair treatment in public spaces,” said Madaleno.

Gov. Martin O’Malley is among those who submitted testimony in support of SB 212.

Gubernatorial candidate Heather Mizeur pointed out during her testimony that the Baltimore County Council passed a trans rights bill after two teenagers attacked Chrissy Lee Polis at a Rosedale McDonald’s in 2011.

“This is a protection we want to make sure gets extended statewide,” said Mizeur. “Protection against discrimination shouldn’t depend on your zip code.”

Mizeur’s Democratic challengers and their running mates — Lieutenant Gov. Anthony Brown and Howard County Executive Ken Ulman and Attorney General Doug Gansler and state Del. Jolene Ivey (D-Prince George’s County) — back SB 212.

Brown and Gansler both submitted written testimony in support of the measure.

“The Fairness for All Marylanders Act of 2014 is critical to our ability to move forward as a state because no Marylander should face discrimination based on gender identity or sexual orientation,” said Brown. “Whether they’re using a public accommodation or finding housing, looking for private sector employment, leasing a commercial space for their business or deciding what to wear for work, all Marylanders deserve to be treated equally.”

Senate President Thomas V. “Mike” Miller (D-Prince George’s and Calvert Counties) and House Speaker Michael Busch (D-Anne Arundel County) also back SB 212.

“The protections in Senate Bill 212 are needed in real people’s lives,” said Equality Maryland Executive Director Carrie Evans. “These individuals are our spouses, our friends, our co-workers and our fellow Marylanders.”

Francis DeBernardo, executive director of New Ways Ministry in Mount Rainier, and Sister Jeannine Gramick, executive co-director of the National Coalition of American Nuns, also testified in support of SB 212.

“We need to incorporate the vulnerable members of our society into our laws and our customs,” said Gramick.

The Maryland Catholic Conference is among the organizations that submitted testimony in opposition to SB 212.

“The church firmly opposes undue harassment or discrimination against any person,” said the group. “That principle does not, however, warrant creating a new class of protected individuals in the state’s anti-discrimination statute, especially when the extension of the law would presumably apply to only a small number of individuals.”

Elaine McDermott of Maryland Citizens for a Responsible Government and Peter Sprigg of the Family Research Council are among those who also spoke against the measure.

“I am here to stand up for women, children and their safety,” said McDermott, who submitted to the committee newspaper articles that detail men who allegedly targeted women and girls in restrooms and locker rooms. “Women worry about their safety in bathrooms and locker rooms. Proponents of this bill deny that there will be problems with restrooms and locker rooms.”

Zane Walsh, 13, of Baltimore County countered McDermott.

“I am not a pervert lurking in the bathroom,” he said. “I’m pretty much a normal kid.”

The Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee last year narrowly killed an identical bill that Madaleno introduced.

State Sens. C. Anthony Muse (D-Prince George’s County) and James Brochin (D-Baltimore County), who voted against the aforementioned measure in 2013, asked Madaleno and other SB 212 supporters about access to restrooms and locker rooms during the hearing. Michael Lore, an aide to state Sen. Norman Stone (D-Baltimore County), told the Washington Blade on Monday that LGBT rights advocates should not expect the lawmaker’s position on the issue to change unless SB 212 supporters address his concerns over employment contracts.

“He was certainly sympathetic to some of the concerns,” said Lore, discussing Stone’s vote against the 2013 bill. “He’s willing to listen to all sides.”

Baltimore City and Baltimore, Montgomery and Howard Counties have already added gender identity and expression to their non-discrimination laws. Hyattsville in December became the first jurisdiction in Prince George’s County to pass a trans-inclusive anti-discrimination ordinance.

“It is time for Maryland to pass this legislation,” said Madaleno.

Gender Rights Maryland Executive Director Dana Beyer, who announced last week she will challenge Madaleno in the June Democratic primary, noted only 47 percent of Marylanders live in jurisdictions that have adopted trans-inclusive anti-discrimination laws.

“This situation is patently unfair,” said Beyer in written testimony. “I ask you to favorably report SB 212 to the floor to remedy that situation.”

Neighboring Delaware is among the 17 states along with D.C. and Puerto Rico that ban discrimination based on gender identity and expression. Lawmakers in Pennsylvania, New York and other states have introduced similar measures.

The Maryland House of Delegates in 2011 approved a trans rights bill. There are enough votes in the state Senate to ensure passage of SB 212 if it advances out of committee.

04
Feb
2014