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Republicans continue to self-destruct

Ann Coulter, CPAC, gay news, Washington Blade

This week, we will be treated to the annual spectacle of the Conservative Political Action Conference, a place where the most outrageous Republicans are invited to spew their venom to the party faithful. In the past the conference has hosted the likes of irrelevant figures like Donald Trump and Ann Coulter. (Washington Blade file photo by Michael Key)

There is a certain Schadenfraude when I hear Republicans say things that are sure to quicken the downward spiral of the national Republican Party.

Republicans in places like Arizona who pass legislation designed to allow people to discriminate just keep adding to the view that the Republican Party today is a place that only welcomes those who want to discriminate against the LGBT community, women and other minorities. The few moderates left seem to be losing any control they once had of the platform or direction of the party.

That makes it difficult to convince people in places like Massachusetts to even consider electing a Republican. Take the case of congressional candidate Richard Tisei who is being touted as a moderate gay Republican who can change the party from within. The facts challenge that assumption. When he ran on a ticket for lieutenant governor with Charlie Baker who claimed to be a moderate, he couldn’t even get him to support basic equality for the transgender community. The Blue Mass group said, “If he can’t convince his own running mate in Massachusetts to be less extreme, how in the world will he convince Republicans from conservative states to be less extreme on gay rights or any other issue?”

Another problem with electing someone like Tisei to Congress is that his first vote would be for Rep. John Boehner (R-Ohio) as House Speaker — the same speaker who has blocked ENDA since the Senate passed it last year.

This week, we will be treated to the annual spectacle of the Conservative Political Action Conference, a place where the most outrageous Republicans are invited to spew their venom to the party faithful. In the past the conference has hosted the likes of irrelevant figures like Donald Trump and Ann Coulter. This year promises to bring more of the same; the intellectual giant Sarah Palin will be there.

Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee and embattled New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie will be two of the big draws. I understand they were excited to invite and get an acceptance from Christie before he got entangled in Bridgegate. It will be interesting to see how far right Christie will go to attract the GOP faithful. They forced Mitt Romney far enough right in the last election to ensure a loss to President Obama. Huckabee, on the other hand, already has just the kind of far-right cred they love.

Then CPAC attendees will surely hear from Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wisc.). This is the same Ryan who ran as Romney’s running mate and managed to gain a reputation as someone who had a few problems telling the truth. He recently spoke about the budget he is preparing for the Republican House, which will question all the programs meant to help those in need, the safety net programs like Medicare, food stamps, Head Start etc. Democrats wait with baited breath to see if his solution is simply to cut these programs or to legitimately improve them.

CPAC attendees will also get to hear from that Joseph McCarthy-like Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas), Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) and Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ken.). They will also get another chance to hear from right-wing Johns Hopkins retired surgeon turned Fox News commentator Dr. Ben Carson. This is the same Carson forced to withdraw as the Johns Hopkins commencement speaker after he compared gay marriage to bestiality and pedophilia. He attacked the Affordable Care Act as socialism by quoting Lenin: “Lenin thought so. He declared: ‘Socialized medicine is the keystone to the arch of the Socialized State.’” Carson apparently took that quote from a brochure attacking Harry Truman for his attempt to get everyone medical insurance and some have disputed that Lenin ever said it.

Democrats aren’t perfect and there are Blue Dog Democrats whose voting records clearly don’t match the Democratic Party platform. The difference is those Democrats don’t control the party and they vote for a leadership team that is progressive and favors ensuring the human and civil rights of all people.

04
Mar
2014

Is it cool to be an independent?

Independent voter, elections, primary, candidates, D.C., gay news, Washington Blade

The ‘I’ label on the ballot means the person doesn’t identify with a particular party and voters don’t necessarily have an indication what they believe. What set of political principles do they espouse?

Some voters believe that registering as an “independent” is a cutting-edge, even cool thing to do. That made me think about party labels, what they mean, and about those who reject party labels yet may want to vote in the primary of a party they made a conscious decision not to join.

I grew up in New York City and like D.C. most voters were Democrats. Many had experiences with discrimination and the Democratic Party was a comfortable political home. New York was a melting pot and home to many minority groups. There were Jews who escaped the Holocaust; Irish Americans whose ancestors escaped the famine; and Cubans who fled Castro. My parents weren’t political but mom was an activist fighting for everything from planting more trees, integrating schools and stopping Columbia University from taking over more of the Morningside Heights neighborhood.

At 12, I joined a local Democratic club. Being a Democrat meant joining the party of JFK, Lyndon Johnson and Robert Kennedy. I was proud to be a member of the party that supported civil rights, women’s rights and, as I got older and came out, the party whose platform evolved to support the rights of the LGBT community.

Disliking a candidate of my party didn’t lead me to become a Republican or an independent but rather inspired me to join with others in the party to push for change. We fought to elect progressive Bill Ryan (D-N.Y.) to Congress. We supported Hubert Humphrey in 1968 and George McGovern in 1972. Though we lost the presidency, we continued to fight for the principles we believed in within the party. We had an intra-party fight that resulted in Bella S. Abzug (D-N.Y.) being the Democratic candidate for Congress after Bill Ryan died. Through the years, the party I choose has been more in tune with my beliefs than any other.

So it’s perplexing that mayoral candidate David Catania, who is smart and an independent, found that the Republican Party matched his principles for all the years it did. He moved to D.C. in 1986 for college and for the next 16 years until 2002, when he was already an elected official, proudly called himself a Republican even supporting and contributing to George W. Bush’s presidential campaign. He left his party and registered as an ‘independent’ only when it became clear the GOP didn’t support gay rights and actually worked to make things worse for the LGBT community. I figured that was for personal expediency to keep his seat on the Council not realizing until recently that it was more than that when he was quoted in the Washington Post saying, “The Republican Party that I grew up with disappeared a long time ago. As far as being an Independent, it’s a suit that really fits. I joke that I’ve been in one bad marriage and I’m not about to jump into another.” He needs to explain what principles the Democratic Party stands for that were so abhorrent to him as to consider it would be a bad marriage.

The ‘I’ label on the ballot means the person doesn’t identify with a particular party and voters don’t necessarily have an indication what they believe. What set of political principles do they espouse? What is it about my Democratic Party they find objectionable? Is it support for unions? LGBT civil and human rights? Public education, women’s rights, choice, equal pay for women, raising the minimum wage, removing impediments to voting or working to deal with climate change? If they agree with all those positions are they simply afraid to run in a primary or are they ‘independent’ simply for political expediency?

Recently it’s been suggested that D.C. voters may be coerced or bullied into voting Democratic. That is absurd and offensive. People vote for candidates whose positions they like and who they feel comfortable with. When they do consider party in their decision, it’s often because it gives them a window into the candidates’ beliefs on issues that may not be part of the discussion in a particular election but are still very important to them.

Some ascribe the ethics problems in D.C. to a particular party. But ethics problems relate to individual candidates. Some might consider that George W. Bush being elected in 2000 caused more harm to District residents, especially those with family members in the military or National Guard, than lying on a mortgage application for which one D.C. Council member was appropriately indicted and convicted.

Positions, history and vision are important when considering who to vote for but don’t be coerced or bullied into not considering party affiliation when voting. It is one factor of so many in choosing a candidate. We have a Democratic president and likely will still have a Democratic Senate in 2015.

During the term of the next mayor we will very possibly elect the first woman president, Democrat Hillary Rodham Clinton. So one additional factor voters might want to consider in choosing a mayor is who will have more access to power to benefit the people of the District. Would it be a former Republican who walked away from his party to become an independent, or a woman who is a proud fifth generation, D.C. Democrat? Just more food for thought.

28
May
2014

Schock and Sinema take a selfie

Aaron Schock, Republican Party, United States House of Representatives, Illinois, gay news, Washington Blade, Kyrsten Sinema, Arizona, Democratic Party, bisexual, anti-gay

Anti-gay Rep. Aaron Schock (R-Ill.) walks along looking at his phone just before the State of the Union Address as bisexual Rep. Kyrsten Sinema digs through her bag. (Washington Blade photo by Michael Key)

Aaron Schock, Republican Party, United States House of Representatives, Illinois, gay news, Washington Blade, Kyrsten Sinema, Arizona, Democratic Party, bisexual, anti-gay
Schock spots Sinema and stops to say hello. (Washington Blade photo by Michael Key)

Aaron Schock, Republican Party, United States House of Representatives, Illinois, gay news, Washington Blade, Kyrsten Sinema, Arizona, Democratic Party, bisexual, anti-gay

Sinema and Schock engage someone else in conversation. (Washington Blade photo by Michael Key)

Aaron Schock, Republican Party, United States House of Representatives, Illinois, gay news, Washington Blade

Schock looks up. (Washington Blade photo by Michael Key)

Aaron Schock, Republican Party, United States House of Representatives, Illinois, gay news, Washington Blade, Kyrsten Sinema, Arizona, Democratic Party, bisexual, anti-gay

Shock sits on Sinema‘s lap. (Washington Blade photo by Michael Key)

Aaron Schock, Republican Party, United States House of Representatives, Illinois, gay news, Washington Blade, Kyrsten Sinema, Arizona, Democratic Party, bisexual, anti-gay

Sinema grabs her phone. (Washington Blade photo by Michael Key)

Aaron Schock, Republican Party, United States House of Representatives, Illinois, gay news, Washington Blade, Kyrsten Sinema, Arizona, Democratic Party, bisexual, anti-gay

Schock takes Sinema‘s phone and holds it out as the two pose for a selfie. (Washington Blade photo by Michael Key)

Aaron Schock, Republican Party, United States House of Representatives, Illinois, gay news, Washington Blade, Kyrsten Sinema, Arizona, Democratic Party, bisexual, anti-gay

Sinema and Schock admire their photo together. (Washington Blade photo by Michael Key)

 

29
Jan
2014

HoCo candidates to speak at PFLAG forum

Allan Kittleman, gay news, Washington Blade

Allan Kittleman, a pro-gay Republican running for Howard County executive, will join his opponent Courtney Watson at a forum next week. (Washington Blade file photo by Michael Key)

Courtney Watson and Allan Kittleman, who are vying to be the next Howard County executive in November’s election, will participate in a forum sponsored by the Howard County Chapter of PFLAG on July 8. The event will take place at 7:30 p.m. at the Owen Brown Interfaith Center, 7246 Cradlerock Way in Columbia.

Watson, a Democrat, and Kittleman, a Republican, have been supportive on LGBT issues and will explain why they would be best for the county’s LGBT citizens. A Q&A session will follow their presentations.

All PFLAG meetings are free, confidential and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served. For more information, visit pflagmd.org.

01
Jul
2014

Bipartisan organizations will shape our movement

LGBT Republicans, LGBT politics, gay news, Washington Blade

The Victory Fund supports the election of openly LGBT candidates, both Democrats and Republicans as well as independents, who have demonstrated leadership in advancing freedom and equal rights for all LGBT Americans.

By CHRISTIAN BERLE & MARISA UCHIN

 

As a Democrat from San Francisco and a Republican from New England, we have put our heads together on why the work the Gay & Lesbian Victory Fund does is critically important to achieving LGBT equality.

From Arizona to Mississippi to Kansas, recent attempts to pass anti-LGBT legislation remind us of the adage “if you’re not at the table, you’re on the menu.” These examples illustrate why it is so important that we elect openly LGBT candidates to office: to ensure that our voice is heard, and that basic freedom and human rights are guaranteed for everyone, regardless of whom they are or who they love. That goal has remained the Gay & Lesbian Victory Fund’s central credo ever since its founding in 1991.

Last week, the Victory Fund was proud to announce the endorsement of two openly gay congressional candidates: Dan Innis, running in New Hampshire, and Richard Tisei, running in Massachusetts. These two candidates were key players in their states’ push for marriage equality. They also happen to be Republicans. We understand the frustration that many individuals in our community are having with Victory’s endorsements of Republicans, particularly in races against strong Democratic allies. Victory’s endorsements do not take place without considerable amounts of forethought and planning.

This debate brings our community to a critical juncture. Without openly LGBT members of Congress from both parties, how will we continue to move full speed ahead toward the equality we deserve?  The answer does not lie in concentrating on short-term partisan gains, but by continuing to endorse openly LGBT viable candidates across the political spectrum who have a demonstrated leadership record in support of LGBT equality.

We believe it is important to acknowledge our appreciation for the significant contributions of our allies and what they have been able to accomplish at all levels of government, but it is Victory’s firm belief that to sustainably move the needle forward we must help create change in both cloakrooms. As we have seen with marriage equality in state legislatures, out LGBT legislators have to be at the table to help their colleagues understand how these votes affect them as people. Put another way, does anyone think Arizona Republicans would have had such an easy time passing anti-LGBT discrimination if an LGBT colleague sat alongside them in those caucus meetings?

If elected, Dan Innis and Richard Tisei will have the ability to speak to their colleagues about why DOMA needs to be fully repealed. As married men with same-sex spouses, they deserve to have the same privileges as their peers. They will be credible voices, spoken from personal experiences as openly gay Americans — about the need for progress on laws, such as ENDA to protect LGBT workers. We know this because their commitment to equality is not new; they both have considerable track records on LGBT issues.

Many in the LGBT community rightfully call on the Republican Party to drop its outdated opposition to LGBT rights. But to do so will require change to the GOP from the inside as well as the outside, and at all levels of government. That is why Victory supports the election of openly LGBT candidates, both Democrats and Republicans as well as independents, who have demonstrated leadership in advancing freedom and equal rights for all LGBT Americans. The election of openly LGBT candidates in recent years has helped bring that goal within reach — but we cannot expect to achieve all we deserve without having out LGBT Republicans at all levels of public office, especially in Congress.

11
Mar
2014

Gay Pa. Republican wins Dem nomination

Mike Fleck, Pennsylvania, gay news, Washington Blade

State Rep. Mike Fleck (R-Huntingdon County) narrowly won the Democratic nomination to appear on the November ballot after losing the Republican primary to a write-in candidate. (Photo courtesy of Fleck)

THREE SPRINGS, Pa. — A gay state representative who is the only out Republican in the Pennsylvania Legislature and the first openly gay state lawmaker there, will appear on the November ballot as a Democrat after he narrowly lost to a primary opponent.

Huntingdon County Treasurer Richard Irvin defeated state Rep. Mike Fleck (R-Huntingdon County) on May 20 after he staged a successful write-in campaign. The Patriot-News on May 27 reported that Fleck won the Democratic nomination to appear on the November ballot by a 901-886 vote margin.

“Thank you to the 15 democrats who put me over the top on the democratic write-in,” wrote Fleck on his Facebook page on May 27. “And thank you to the three thousand plus republicans who voted based on my job performance. While a lot can still happen legally, today is a new day and if we are ultimately successful in our bid to continue thru the fall, rest assured, I will give it my all.”

Fleck, who was first elected to the Pennsylvania House of Representatives in 2006, came out in 2012 during an interview with a local newspaper.

He told the Patriot-News on May 27 he feels his opponents voted against him because of his sexual orientation.

“I think we all know what the race was about,” said Fleck. “For the most part it was a vote against me, not necessarily a vote for [Irvin.]“

28
May
2014

EXCLUSIVE: Va. Republican lawmaker backs gay nuptials

Joseph Yost, Virginia, Republican Party, marriage equality, same-sex marriage, gay marriage, gay news, Washington Blade

Virginia Del. Joseph Yost (R-Giles County) (Photo public domain)

RICHMOND, Va.—A member of the Virginia House of Delegates on Tuesday became the first Republican state lawmaker to back marriage rights for same-sex couples.

“As far as same-sex marriage goes, it does not bother me,” state Del. Joseph Yost (R-Giles County) told the Washington Blade during an interview at an Equality Virginia reception that took place at the Library of Virginia in downtown Richmond. “Why not?”

Yost, who represents the 12th Senate District that includes Radford, Giles County and portions of Montgomery and Pulaski Counties in southwestern Virginia, spoke with the Blade less than a week after Attorney General Mark Herring announced he would not defend the commonwealth’s constitutional amendment that defines marriage as between a man and a woman. Yost, 27, also discussed the Republican Party of Virginia’s blistering criticisms of Herring over his announcement.

“It boils down to tradition; it’s just a generational gap,” said Yost. “I don’t think the government should be involved in marriage period — straight or gay. I feel like we have bigger things to worry about.”

The House of Delegates Civil Law Committee later on Wednesday is scheduled to vote on Yost’s bill that seeks to extend adoption rights to same-sex couples in Virginia. A state Senate committee on Jan. 24 killed an identical measure that state Sen. Janet Howell (D-Fairfax County) introduced earlier this month.

Yost earlier this month introduced a bill that sought to extend adoption rights to same-sex couples in Virginia.

“It’s pretty much a no-brainer issue,” Yost told the Blade. “It’s not about Democrats; it’s not about Republicans; it’s not about gay couples; it’s not about straight couples. It’s about the kids.”

Yost further discussed the issue.

“If there are two loving individuals out there who want to raise a child together, I see no reason why they can’t,” he said. “Quite frankly it’s about fairness.”

State Del. Ron Villanueva (R-Virginia Beach) earlier this month introduced a bill that sought to ban anti-LGBT employment discrimination in Virginia. State Sen. Jill Holtzman Vogel (R-Winchester) last week voted for a bill that would have banned discrimination against LGBT state employees, while state Dels. Gordon Helsel (R-Poquoson) and Tom Rust (R-Fairfax County) have co-sponsored Yost’s second-parent adoption measure.

“I think when you look at where the party started and its history, it’s a party that was based on equality,” Yost told the Blade. “It’s what we do.”

Yost further described second-parent adoption and non-discrimination as “small potato issues.”

“I come from a younger generation,” he said. “I don’t get wrapped around the axle on these issues like some of my other colleagues. I think the more young people you see coming into politics, that’s what’s going to happen.”

29
Jan
2014

Hobby Lobby and the war on women

Hobby Lobby, gay news, Washington Blade

Hobby Lobby (Photo by Mike Kalasnik; courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

The Supreme Court continued its war on women with the decision in Sebelius v. Hobby Lobby.

The case was about whether the religious owners of Hobby Lobby stores could determine which contraceptive devices they will include in the health insurance they make available to their employees based on their own religious beliefs rather than on the requirements of the Affordable Care Act, which guarantees access to coverage for all approved FDA contraceptive devices.

Organizations like The Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, a right-wing group supported the owners of the Hobby Lobby stores. They contend they could use their own religious beliefs and transfer those to the business, a corporation closely held by the family, to determine these decisions.

Walter Dellinger, acting solicitor general in the Clinton administration, posited correctly in an op-ed in the Washington Post, that the result of what the owners of Hobby Lobby asked the court to sanction was the ability to, “Selectively deny insurance coverage for contraceptive methods an employer considers sinful effectively making the employer a party to a woman’s medical consultations.”

Those of us who believe in the separation of church and state had hoped this issue had been decided long ago and that it would be evident that Hobby Lobby violated that separation. But clearly that isn’t the case. In its decision, the court held that “closely held corporations cannot be required to provide contraception coverage.” They went further and held, “The government has failed to show that the mandate is the least restrictive means of advancing its interest in guaranteeing cost-free access to birth control.” In his concurring opinion Justice Kennedy wrote, “The government could pay for the coverage itself, so that women receive it.” What the court said is that it is fine for the corporation to discriminate against women and make them figure out another way to get their health coverage.

This decision, following on others such as the denial of a buffer zone at Planned Parenthood sites, makes it even more urgent for those who believe in both women’s rights and the strict separation of church and state to vote in the 2014 mid-term elections and keep the Senate in Democratic hands. The focus must then turn to ensuring that a Democrat is elected president in 2016. It is clear that as long as the right wing controls the Republican Party, their victories will mean the appointment of justices at all levels who don’t believe women should control their healthcare or in the clear separation of church and state.

When a corporation with 13,000 employees can justify even some healthcare decisions based solely on the owners’ religious beliefs there is a problem. We need to work to stop our nation from continuing down this path of blurring the separation of church and state even further.

On the positive side, the court did hold that its decision “concerns only the contraceptive mandate and should not be understood to mean that all insurance mandates, that is for blood transfusions or vaccinations, necessarily fail if they conflict with an employer’s religious beliefs.”  It also apparently does not provide a shield for employers who might cloak illegal discrimination as a religious practice such as discrimination against the LGBT community. But this makes it even clearer that this is a decision against women’s rights by five old white men.

What saved this week from being one of total depression for me was being fortunate to have had the opportunity to listen to the final sermon from Pastor Dean Snyder at Foundry United Methodist Church before his retirement. Snyder spoke of God’s love for all people and that we are all equal in his/her eyes. For 12 years, Dean Snyder has been senior pastor at Foundry and with his wife Jane has been a tower of strength standing up for individual rights. Together they have shown a clear understanding of the separation of church and state even when their own denomination disagreed.

He preached that God doesn’t discriminate. Snyder practiced his faith and stood with the homeless and poor; the downtrodden and the marginalized. Both he and Jane have been leaders in the movements to ensure that civil law is applied equally to all. Listening to Snyder has been inspirational even though I am not a Methodist. He always made me, as he did everyone with whom he came in contact, feel at home at Foundry and he restored my faith in religion.

For all those who believe in women’s rights and the sanctity of the separation of church and state, the Hobby Lobby case should be a rallying cry to elect candidates at all levels of government who share those beliefs.

03
Jul
2014

Oregon GOP backs marriage referendum

Oregon, Mt. Hood, Mirror Lake, referendum, gay news, Washington Blade

Mount Hood in Oregon. (Photo public domain)

SEASIDE, Ore. — Republicans who attended an annual GOP conference on March 8 voted to endorse a proposed referendum on whether marriage should be extended to same-sex couples in the state.

The Oregonian reported those who attended the annual Dorchester Conference voted 233-162 in favor of the referendum.

“We’re not a threat to the institution [of marriage], believe me,” gay Portland attorney Jerry Keene told the newspaper. “If we’re allowed access to the institution, we’ll take care of it.”

Oregon United for Marriage maintains it has enough signatures to place the issue on the November ballot. Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum last month announced she will not defend the state’s same-sex marriage ban that voters approved in 2004.

12
Mar
2014

D.C. Council candidate receives hate letter

hate letter, Marc Morgan, gay news, Washington Blade

This is the hate letter that Marc Morgan says he received.

D.C. police are seeking to identify the person who hand-delivered a letter with an anti-gay and racist message to the home of gay ANC commissioner and at-large City Council candidate Marc Morgan late Wednesday night or early Thursday morning.

The printed letter, which Morgan said was folded and placed in his mailbox, addresses him by name.

“God hates fags – we hate you,” says the letter, which is written in all capital letters. “Go die now…and we know where U live too.”

Morgan said he saw the folded letter sticking out of his mailbox as he left his house about 10 a.m. Thursday. He said he immediately contacted D.C. Police Chief Cathy Lanier, who arranged for Third District officers to investigate the incident.

According to Morgan, an officer conducting the investigation listed the matter as a “bias motivated incident.” Other officers with the department’s crime scene unit came to his house on 2nd Street, N.W., in the city’s LeDroit Park neighborhood to look for fingerprints and took photos. He said police were also looking into whether a suspect might be identified through video footage taken by several video surveillance cameras that are stationed in the neighborhood.

“This is not politics,” said Morgan, who is running for the Council seat as a Republican. “This has nothing to do with me running for Council. This person is trying to jeopardize my safety and I just want him thrown in jail.”

Added Morgan: “This is me stepping into the role of a father now because I have a son. And I don’t want someone running around my house scaring my family or scaring my neighbors or making vicious remarks or attacks on me.”

Morgan said he discovered the letter a little over an hour after he received a Twitter message from a man who denounced him as an “abomination” in the eyes of God. The man, who self identifies as Muslim, apparently sent his Twitter message to Morgan in response to a Twitter message that Morgan posted one day earlier.

In the earlier message, Morgan said he expressed concern that members of the anti-gay Westboro Baptist Church of Kansas were planning to come to Washington next week to protest an LGBT Pride event organized by students at Woodrow Wilson High School and the city’s annual Capital Pride Parade.

“I posted something saying we don’t need that kind of hatred here in the District of Columbia,” Morgan told the Blade. “And it just sort of seems that right after I posted it all this craziness broke out.”

Although the anonymous letter and the Twitter messages – sent by a man identifying himself as
“Unity Flow” and “Mustafa” – appeared to have surfaced around the same time, Third District Officer Perry Morgan told him the two did not appear to be connected or sent by the same person.

The officer, who’s not related to Marc Morgan, was less certain about whether the letter writer has a connection to the Westboro Baptist Church or was merely imitating the church’s anti-gay rhetoric, Marc Morgan said. The church’s members repeatedly use the term “God hates fags” in its literature and in the placards they hold while staging anti-gay protests.

“We didn’t know if it was somebody affiliated with that church or maybe pretending to be affiliated with that church,” Morgan said.

“It never ceases to amaze me how cowards love to use the veil of anonymity and secrecy to threaten, intimidate and bully,” said Robert Turner, the gay executive director of the D.C. Republican Party.

“We will work with MPD and hope they quickly find the culprit,” Turner said in a statement.

Morgan is running for the Council seat being vacated by Council member David Catania (I-At-Large), who’s running for mayor. All of the candidates running for the seat have expressed support for LGBT rights.

30
May
2014